• Image of My '90s - Polaroids by Craig Wedren (limited to 80 copies)
  • Image of My '90s - Polaroids by Craig Wedren (limited to 80 copies)
  • Image of My '90s - Polaroids by Craig Wedren (limited to 80 copies)
  • Image of My '90s - Polaroids by Craig Wedren (limited to 80 copies)
  • Image of My '90s - Polaroids by Craig Wedren (limited to 80 copies)

My 90's is a limited print, hardbound collection of photos taken by Craig Wedren in the early 1990s on his beloved Polaroid Spectra camera. In addition to documenting Craig's tales from the road with his band Shudder to Think, My '90s provides an intimate look at Craig's time with friends including Fugazi, Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam, and members of The State.

Hard cloth bound first edition, limited to 80 copies. Shipping mid-March.

Here's a description of My '90s from Craig himself:

My ‘90s were nocturnal, for better and for glorious worse.
I was in a band, Shudder To Think, that had been my primary framework and source of identity since 1986–again, for better and for worse; but mostly for better, because we were a very special group.
I’d always been a visual kind of artist -my lyrics tended toward the dreamlike and cinematic, my style of dress and hair ever-changing and somewhat theatrical.
Punk Impressionism.
When I got my hands on a Canon A-1 sometime during High School (a holy hand-me-down from my Stepfather, I think), I naturally and immediately began taking pictures that fell right in with the music, lyrics, and other art I was (and still seem to be) feverishly generating.
Cut to 1992.
Shudder To Think was on tour with Fugazi, delivering our sensual assault to college towns around the Northeast.
I believe it was Guy Picciotto (one of Fugazi’s singer/guitarrorists) who, in a chilly, grey parking lot (it was Autumn) turned me on to the gadget that would instantly become my constant companion for the next decade or so, the Polaroid Spectra camera.
But this was no ordinary camera.
It was ugly as hell, big and plastic, like a cheap tennis shoe fucked a cut-rate spaceship.
Unintentionally–or so it seemed–the design of this model (and this model only, as far as I can tell) was such that you could trick it into taking multiple exposures, as many as you dared, in a single photograph.
That, in addition to the ways one can manipulate/mutilate a still-fresh Polaroid picture, gave me a portable engine, an image-kiln for loooosely documenting the parade of experiences, colors, feelings, and sounds that filled my circus-like, and often just plain boring-ass days and nights.
And late nights.
And verrry early mornings.
Every few years (if you’re lucky, if you’re looking) a new technology arises that is roughly the same shape as one’s heart.
The chemistry is immediate, love-at-first-sight, like the artist and the instrument are two pieces of a two-piece puzzle.
For me, the Spectra camera was just that.
I grabbed it and never let go.
Until they stopped making Spectra film, that is, alas…
What you see here is a sliver of my favorite images from that era.
I hope they infect your dreams, and help connect you to your own vision.
Thank you.
Love, always.
Craig